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  1. bounce

    • IPA[baʊns]

    英式

    • v.
      (with reference to an object, especially a ball) move quickly up, back, or away from a surface after hitting it;(of light, sound, or an electronic signal) come into contact with an object or surface and be reflected back
    • n.
      a rebound of a ball or other object;the ability of a surface to make a ball rebound in a specified way
    • noun: bounce, plural noun: bounces

    • verb: bounce, 3rd person present: bounces, gerund or present participle: bouncing, past tense: bounced, past participle: bounced

    • 釋義
    • 相關詞
    • 片語
    • v.
      動詞
    • 1. (with reference to an object, especially a ball) move quickly up, back, or away from a surface after hitting it:

      the ball bounced away and he chased it

      he was bouncing the ball against the wall

    • 2. (of light, sound, or an electronic signal) come into contact with an object or surface and be reflected back:

      short sound waves bounce off even small objects

    • 3. (of an email) be returned to its sender after failing to reach its destination:

      I tried to email him, but the message bounced

    • 4. recover well after a setback or problem:

      the savings rate has already started to bounce back and is sure to rise further

    • 5. come into sudden forceful contact with; collide with:

      people cross the road as slowly as possible, as if daring the cars to bounce them

    • 6. jump repeatedly up and down, typically on something springy:

      Emma was happily bouncing up and down on the mattress

    • 7. move up and down repeatedly:

      the gangplank bounced under his confident step

    • 8. cause (a child) to move lightly up and down on one's knee as a game:

      I remember how you used to bounce me on your knee

    • 9. (of a vehicle) move jerkily along a bumpy surface:

      the car bounced down the narrow track

    • 10. move in a particular direction in an energetic, happy, or enthusiastic manner:

      Linda bounced in through the open front door

    • 11. (of a cheque) be returned by a bank to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it:

      a further two cheques of £160 also bounced

    • 12. (of a bank) return a cheque to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it:

      the bank bounced the cheque

    • 13. eject (a troublemaker) forcibly from a nightclub or similar establishment.
    • 14. dismiss (someone) from a job:

      those who put in a dismal performance will be bounced from the tour

    • 15. pressurize (someone) into doing something, typically by presenting them with a fait accompli:

      the government should beware being bounced into any ill-considered foreign gamble

    • n.
      名詞
    • 1. a rebound of a ball or other object:

      the wicket was causing the occasional erratic bounce

    • 2. the ability of a surface to make a ball rebound in a specified way:

      a pitch of low bounce

    • 3. a collision.
    • 4. an act of jumping or of moving up and down jerkily:

      every bounce of the truck brought them into fresh contact

    • 5. a sudden rise in the level of something:

      economists agree that there could be a bounce in prices next year

    • 6. exuberant self-confidence:

      the bounce was now back in Jenny's step

    • 7. health and body in a person's hair:

      use conditioner to help hair regain its bounce

    • adj. (of a ball) rebounding up and down:

    • an awkwardly bouncing ball

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    • adj. (of a baby) vigorous and healthy:

    • Lisa gave birth to a bouncing baby boy

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    • n. a device for giving reflected photographic flashlight.

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    • n. a device for giving reflected photographic flashlight.

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    • n. the percentage of visitors to a particular website who navigate away from the site after viewing only one page:

    • a rising bounce rate is a sure sign that your homepage is boring or off-putting

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    • n. the percentage of visitors to a particular website who navigate away from the site after viewing only one page:

    • a rising bounce rate is a sure sign that your homepage is boring or off-putting

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    • as something rebounds

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    • n. a temporary recovery in share prices after a substantial fall, caused by speculators buying in order to cover their positions:

    • is the recession really over, or is it a dead cat bounce?

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    • IPA[bouns]

    美式

    • v.
      (of an object, especially a ball) move quickly up, back, or away from a surface after hitting it; rebound (once or repeatedly):
    • the ball bounced away and he chased it

      he was bouncing the ball against the wall

    • n.
      a rebound of a ball or other object:
    • a bad bounce caused the ball to get away from the second baseman

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