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  1. shore

    • IPA[ʃɔː]

    英式

    • n.
      a prop or beam set obliquely against something weak or unstable as a support.
    • v.
      support or hold up something with props or beams;support or assist something that would otherwise fail or decline
    • verb: shore, 3rd person present: shores, gerund or present participle: shoring, past tense: shored, past participle: shored

    • noun: shore, plural noun: shores

    • 釋義
    • 相關詞

    名詞

    • 1. a prop or beam set obliquely against something weak or unstable as a support.

    動詞

    • 1. support or hold up something with props or beams rescue workers had to shore up the building, which was in danger of collapse
    • support or assist something that would otherwise fail or decline Congress approved a $700 billion plan to shore up the financial industry
    • n.
      leisure time spent ashore by a sailor: the hall was full of sailors on shore leave

    Oxford Dictionary

    • ph.
      ashore; on land

    Oxford Dictionary

    • ph.
      on the water near land or nearer to land

    Oxford Dictionary

    • n.
      a shore lying on the leeward side of a ship (and on to which a ship could be blown in foul weather).

    Oxford American Dictionary

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    • IPA[ʃɔː]

    英式

    • n.
      the land along the edge of a sea, lake, or other large body of water: I made for the shore

    Oxford Dictionary

    • IPA[SHôr]

    美式

    • n.
      the land along the edge of a sea, lake, or other large body of water: I took the tiller and made for the shore

    Oxford American Dictionary

    • IPA[SHôr]

    美式

    • n.
      a prop or beam set obliquely against something weak or unstable as a support.
    • v.
      support or hold up something with props or beams: rescue workers had to shore up the building, which was in danger of collapse

    Oxford American Dictionary

    • IPA[ʃɔː]

    英式

    • v.
      archaic past of shear

    Oxford Dictionary

    • IPA[SHôr]

    美式

    • v.
      archaic past of shear

    Oxford American Dictionary